Dangerous and Painful Fashion Trends “From The Past”: Part One

  • Well some are from the past, and some, we are still doing. But as we’ve always been told, pain is beauty. Am I right?

Say it isn’t so, beauty doesn’t have to be painful. Or does it? Think about all the things us women go through for beauty, from waxing and the gym, to corsets or even plastic surgery, these are some of the dangerous and painful fashion trends that should be stopped.

Rib Removal

Yes, this is a thing, to go under the knife to get some of your ribs removed. Seems crazy but it does happen. Who doesn’t want a gorgeous hourglass figure? Having an hourglass figure has been one of the biggest beauty trends since way back in the Victorian era, and just like then, women will go to almost any length to achieve it. Laced corsets have been used ever since to shape and make your figure appear smaller. But yes, some women even have ribs removed from their body to attain this “perfect” shape.


Tapeworm Diet

Have you ever heard of a tapeworm? It’s basically an infection, and a typical symptom includes losing weight. People took “having a tapeworm” to a whole new level, by giving it to themselves. Crazy? Yes, but true. Victorian women really upped the ante when they embraced this weight-loss method. They called it, the tapeworm diet. This diet, per say, involved ingesting pills made from “sterilized” tapeworm eggs. The idea of course is that the tapeworm will eat all of your calories, therefore helping you shed those extra pounds. However, tapeworms don’t always attach themselves to the digestive system organs and therefore could produce several ill effects including nausea, fever, diarrhea, and abdominal pain. And also, tapeworms can be deadly, so there’s that to think about. This has got to be one of the worst ideas and fashion trends, as it were.

Chopines

Lots of women love high heels while others, just don’t. However, when chopines came onto the scene in the 16th century and are called a killer platform shoe. And for good reason. They honestly look a *bit* like modern wedges but not so sturdy, and thinking back to the 16th century, the roads/sidewalks/ground was not even, and women commonly fell over due to their chopines. They shows were mainly worm by societies elite, to protect their dresses from the mud and street soil. Good goal but who cares about your dress if you’re falling onto the ground anyhow?

Crinoline Dresses

These types of dresses are still worn today, which is a little crazy considering their history. Crinoline dresses are made from a highly flammable material, but of course that didn’t stop hundreds of women from staying on-trend with the look, even though they risked their lives to do it. It was estimated that 630 women died from crinoline-related incidents between 1863-64 alone, by the famed English statistician Florence Nightingale. Oscar Wilde’s sisters were among the women who died while doning these disastrous dressed. Emily and Mary both passed away after their evening dresses caught on fire.

Crakows

This famous shoe was named after the Polish City of Kraków, when they first came onto the scene in the 15th century. Just looking at these shoes makes it clear why they didn’t stay trendy for  long and ended up being banned in several countries. These shoes had very long, pointed tips/beaks making them beyond impractical. They would lead to fatal falls due to how difficult it was to walk in them. They were quickly fazed out.

High Foreheads

You know, when someone has a very large forehead, also known as a fivehead? (I, myself, have what I call a fivehead, so I can say that.) Anyhow, this was a trend during the Elizabethan times, as high foreheads were considered a sign of beauty and some women would even pluck back their hairline to achieve this look. However, this can harm hair growth, and slow it down, when hair is repeatedly pulled out from the scalp. Once the follicle is injured, the hair doesn’t always grow back. But since that was the whole point, Elizabethan women didn’t mind that the hair may not come back, and in fact, they hoped it wouldn’t. If this is still a fashion trend, I’m on it! (Already and naturally, no hair pulling from this girls fivehead.)

Do you participate in any of these “old school” but some still common beauty practices? If you liked this, watch for Dangerous and Painful Fashion Trends “From The Past”: Part Two.

 

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